"Hairwork"
Tid-bit's & Hello's --- from hairwork Enthusiasts

Years ago I learned how to make hair flowers from my Grandmother. I didn't realize at the time what I prize possession I had gained. Now my Grandmother has passed on and I have been called on to demonstrate the are of hair flowers. At this point, some 21 years later, I have realized what a wonderful possession she gave me. When my Grandmother was around she had a large picture on her wall that was a basket made of hair and then it was full of all types and of flowers. Also every color of hair possible was in this picture. That is not available to me at this point but I have a picture of it. Now I would like to meet with anyone else that knows about hairflowers to teach me and refresh my memory on this wonderful art. I inherited her box of hair that she had saved over the last 25 to 30 years. Each packet is labeled with the name and year. She has everything wrapped in newspaper, envelopes, sacks, etc. I even found an old Rolled Oates carboard canister full of these wonderful packets. All the hair belongs to Cousins, Aunts, Sisters, or relatives of some sort. I am now in the process of making my own picture to resemble the one that was in my Grandmothers home.


I will take a pic of it and E-Mail it to you (JPEG) as soon as I can. Will be a bit though... Not a fancy thing at all, just a basic varnished wooden disk with pie shaped divisions and number/letter designators. Also has a split cone that fits the center hole to make rings for use in other projects. She used horsehair to form the base for the rings and overlayed the finish material be it hair or thread. Very similar to the device illustrated on the cover page of one of the two books you have on hairbraiding. Take care Les


I can't believe how much searching I have had to do on the internet to find any sites associated with hairwork!!! Thanks so much for creating this site, and for the links. I have been interested in hairwork since I was very little and saw some hairwork done by one of my great, great, great Aunts......unfortunately it was later destroyed. I have just started collecting hairwork, and yesterday I bought two watch fobs where the inner cord is completely worked over with hair. They are lovely, and in pretty good condition. I will continue to search, and probably will do pretty well in my area, since most people around here think the stuff is morbid! Again, thanks for the site, and I look forward to corresponding with others that have an interest in hairwork. .....I thought I should tell you where I am, and a little (not much) about me! I am from a teeny, tiny town, called Gaines, in Michigan. I have a 16 year old daughter who thinks hairwork is "Gross." I wanted to let you know that I was in a couple of antique sites where I found a couple of things with hairwork. One was a brooch with blonde hair coiled into the Prince of Wales plumes, it was beautiful. The other site had a dress with passementerie (sp?) around the collar of beautiful, almost TOO blonde hair!!! It was unbelievable. I THINK I can find the sites again, and, if you haven't already seen them, I could pass them on to you. Hope to hear from you, Callie


Hi! I wanted to tell you that I visted your homepage with your hairwork pieces. I am so glad to see others are now collecting hair art! I collected these wonderful beauties in the 60's and the 70's, and still have some packed away! This is the work of very talented, gifted people, with so much love and sentiment involved. I even have hair Pictures SOMEWHERE put away. Have you seen those? Its somewhat like one of your collection, but I cannot see enough of it to tell...but the entire picture has hair embellishments. I love this stuff. Since you asked, I thought I would mention that from as much as I can tell, the one piece that has the amber, are you sure that is not carnelian or agate? You might want to take a closer look, its absolutely stunning. You know, we recently had a swap meet here where the gal brought all her jewelry out for sale. In it was several wonderful hairwork pieces. Everything was half price. Darn if I only knew there was someone else out there looking for hair art! I will keep you in mind, if I come across anything and let you know. Grin


I have the device that my Great-Great Grandmother used to make a variety of hairwork jewlery items. I would like to learn the technique and use it to make watch chains, but was unable to master the technique from the limited materials I was able to find in the local library. Had to photocopy pages as the only text they had that dealt with hair braiding was a non-circulating reference book! Thanks Les Clark


(What is dissolved hair?)

Hi Marlys, I don't have the exact process of how they dissolved hair to make mourning jewelry and apparently it was an early practice. One of my research books on antique jewelry shows several photos or brooches and rings. The rings are shown with urns and angels and talk of dissolved hair of the deceased on ivory. Often these items are displayed in an entire mourning scene. I saw one once with a woman standing at a monument under a weeping willow tree and the branches of the tree were made with dissolved hair. These are seldom found and are really rare. I understand that there are also mourning pieces made with the ashes of the deceased! Now I missed seeing one of those at a show once, and have never actually seen one..somehow these seem really morbid! I'll look through my research info and if I come up with more on dissolved hair, I'll let you know. Not much is written about it in the books that I have ever found, probably because it is so rare.


Marlys..Thanks you for the reply. Please add me to your list. I have a friend with a large collection of hair wreathes as well as scenes ( such as a grave and willow tree) made of hair and wax. She is always looking for more as well. I do have some pieces of antique hair jewelry for sale at my store. I will get a better description and a photo and post them with you. I look forward to your new expanded site as well as keeping in touch with you and other hair collectors...Mike


If you have a news letter, please put me on the mailing list. I collect hair wreaths and a little jewelry. and I would love to learn how to make the jewelry, and have collected some hair. I'm so glad to have found a domain for hair enthusiasts! Regards sharon


Hi Marlys I live in Australia and have been searching for info on hairwork for many years. It seems like no one here has ever heard of it. I have tried many libraries etc for books but have no luck. I would love to begin this craft and make it a recognised art form here. I would appreciate any information you can provide me. Is ther anyone you know of in Australia that practices this craft? Also if I were to order the books you are advertising could I send a money order to you and how much would each book be including post? I am desperate for any help that you can give me. I have never seen any real hairwork but it sounds so intrigueing and etheral. Thanks for your time. Andrea


Marlys, I first saw this about three years ago in a living history type farm museum. I felt it quite eerie and disgusting when I realized what it was. It was a very large shadow box with a lot of flowers, etc. It may even have been the horeshoe shape. I will have to make a retrun trip to see it again. Just before Halloween of this year I encountered my second view of this. It was quite a bit smaller, but again a shadow box. I am guessing it was about 18" by 12" or so and was for sale for over $400. I was flabbergasted!! Now coincidentally I have found your site. FATE! I am not in the income bracket to afford such a thing, so I did not buy it...boy would my husband have flipped his lid if I had! I am amazed at the intricacy. I do many forms of needle work and know what is involved. I will keep checking back to your site. NEAT! Fondly~ Jean


Thanks Marlys, I just checked it out and its wonderful! Are their people who are making hair jewelry now? I had no idea and only collect and sell the victorian pieces. How interesting! Thanks for letting me know of your site. Linda


Dear Marlys, First, thanks for thinking of me and informing me of your site. It was a pleasure to read the articles and stories, and the pieces displayed were wonderful. Next, thanks for sharing your personal items and last but not least, I'd like to order the book by M. Campbell, the Art of Hairwork. Please email me full price & I'll mail check immediately. Good luck with your new site. Thanks, Carol


Thank you for letting me know about your web site. I was looking for information on hair jewelry and was delighted to find there are other people with a similar interest. I have been collecting them for/with my wife, Marisabel.


Thank you for including me in your network. I am very interested in hair jewelry & mourning jewelry. I have a small collection. My husband is interested in the Civil War and as you know mourning jewelry was very popular at that time. My collection consists of 5 pieces all brooches.
1.feather design with seed pearls under glass with scroll border.
2.brown/blonde hair in a basket weave under glass , rimmed in black enamel, that is surrounded by twisted rope border.
3.brown hair in a pretzel weave with a tiny bow made out of blonde hair in the middle, trimmed in "gold" that has a scroll imprint at each end & top and bottom.
4.large brooch that has brown hair braided & in a circle around a large piece of gray/white hair.
5. brown hair in a basket weave the brooch part is plain & the glass is broken & the pin is missing from the back.
With the exception of #5 all have a C clasp & none of them are engraved.
I look forward to the growth of your website & I already have it bookmarked. I do alot of my searching for pieces in Pennsylvanis, especially in the New Oxford & Gettysburg area. There are many pieces available, a lot are engraved & therefore very high in price, as they usually are dated also. Thanks again for including me!!! Cathy


Gee!! Thanks for the info. I did not know there was a Hairwork Society--I knew of the lady from Sweden who makes pieces from a book I got on Hairweaving from Lacis publishing I believe--anyway I have been collecting hair pieces for 20 years--I have some pins, bracelets, necklaces, pendants,hairwork underglass and a couple of diadems--The oldest piece I have is 1796--I think--it is engraved a lieutenant and the battle--Most of my collection is at my parents home--someday I will retrieve it--Have you been collecting long??-- ---Thanks--Julie


Dear Marlys, I am so pleased to find your web page on hairwork. I have been doing hairwork for about 4 years. I enjoy making hair flowers as well as braided hair jewelry. I quit my full time job to start my business "Hair Art - Keepsakes Made of Hair" almost a year and a half ago. Since then, I have made keepsakes for people all across the U.S. I love hairwork of all kinds and especially enjoy the people stories that go along with hairwork. I demonstrate at living history museums here in the midwest and tell people about the art where ever I go. My husband accuses me of searching out new "victims" to talk hair with. Of course I collect old pieces when my pocketbook allows and I enjoy looking at them for ideas for new pieces. I first saw hairwork at "The Hair Museum" in Independence, Missouri. This is a very large collection of antique hairwork (hundreds of wreaths and jewelry items). I started practicing hairwork because of the joy it brought to me. I never dreamed it would be a way to bring such joy to others. I have been surprised at how many people today have saved hair -- their own as well as others. I have made pieces for people out of every family member's hair, friend's hair, even poodle hair! People seem to be either intrigued or repulsed by hairwork; there's no middle ground. Sometimes at a demonstration, people will walk up, and their first response is "Oh gross!" After talking with them for a minute, they remember that they have hair at home in their drawer. Then it doesn't seem so gross since they keep hair too. Hairwork is not only a beautiful art form but a wonderful sentimental token of love; a bond between us celebrating life. After all, we all have hair and it can last forever....... Nancy


Hello, I really enjoyed and appreciated your "Hairwork Society" web page. I have been looking for info on hairwork for so long. Shari Brooklyn, New York


Marlys, Thank you so much for telling me about this! PLEASE put me on you mailing list!! I became interested in Victorian Mourning Jewelry a year ago when I lost my only daughter, Danielle. I was looking for something to hold her picture and lock of her hair, and discovered the Victorian Hairwork Jewelry. It has opened up a whole new world to me, as I have become so intrigued with their customs as well. This is wonderful, I have already bookmarked your page, and will love being a part of this. Please, if you know of any Books that will help me or ANYONE THAT DOES hairwork, I would like to have their name. I have some of Dani's hair and would like to see it done right in my Brooch. Take care.... Janice in Chattanooga


I have been in love with hair jewelry and the victorian mourning jewelry for several years. I have the book on hair weaving by Campbell. But as of yet haven't gotten my stand set up. Another good resource has been , Godeys ladys book. I am looking for a copy of this just to say I have it. Recently purchased a 1 inch brooch for hair weaving that was never used. Can't wait to try. Also when I was on the Ebay auctions I found some interesting uses for hair as memory pictures and poems.
Have a great day. Liz


Just a thought, how about some actual pictures of hairwork? I have a brooch that is just beautiful. It has flowers and seed pearls and is on a rotating fitting where a picture of a loved one was, at one time, on the reverse side. And I have several watch fobs. I am fascinated by this art and have 3 brooches, and about 3 or 4 fobs. Am afraid to wear any for fear of losing or damaging them, but really would like to.
Thanks Judi
From the Town that Water Built
Mineral Wells, TX


I was on the road for near 2 months and have purchased some hairwork pieces. In my area of the West (Utah) not many have ever heard of hairwork. I only found one earring piece that was gold. The rest that I did purchase appeared old and a couple of the pieces had a mark of 1/10 on the clasp. I assume that means 1/10 gold filled, but not sure. All of the peices are either watchfobs or chains. Two have a bauble hanging one of jade and the other topaz. The findings look more like brass or tarnished silver. I found one piece real simular to one I saw at the Pioneer Village museum in Nebraska. There peice was dated 1860. I also found a fob that looked more to me like chained horsehair. It had a pat.date of 1862. I met a antique dealer in Iowa that is quite a hairwork collector. He has over 300 pieces already and is very interested in networking with us.
ALL GREAT THINGS START SOMEWHERE!!!!!
Keep in touch,
Marlys Fladeland
Hairwork Society


The piece you describe probably is horsehair---it is tougher, more resiliant, and easier to work with than human hair and was often resorted to (sometimes without the family knowing it). By and large, horsehair appears shinier and thicker than human hair. A loupe will almost always show the difference. You might also want to get in touch with Pam Huskey of Miles of History. Any search engine will connect you to her and husband Miles' website. She specializes in mid-Victorian jewelry and is extremely knowledgeable. I wrote an article about jewelry of the era, including but not limited to hair jewelry, in both the magazine (Jan.-Feb. '96) and in our new Civil War Collector's Price Guide. Either can be posted to your website, if you like...once I find the backups for it, that is.
Best,
Nancy


I am by no means a hairwork expert, but I do love it. I have been collecting it for some time now. I have some wreaths, and several jewelry pieces. Some gold, some gold filled. Some in rough shape, some so well preserved that it looks new. I am currently trying to teach myself. I have ordered a table and I have hair that I have gotten from box lots at auctions. I know that sounds gross, but it is very long hair, and I only had to bid against people that wanted a few old plates. So, needless to say I got some cheap hair. I would love to contribute pictures of some of my "pet Pieces". Maybe you should add a chatline to your site, so we all have a place to come together. Thanks for the contact, and keep in touch...
Sandi McCaslin


The watch chain was an often chosen piece of jewelry made of hair because when a couple were engaged the woman would have her hair woven by the hair weavers (called professionally "Hair Spiders" and give it to her new husband as a wedding gift. It would have gold or gold filled findings handmade by a jeweler. A watch chain was chosen because when he looked at his watch, several times a day, he would naturally think of her. A chain made of hair(example) may require each hair section to be 6 inches long. This would require the weavers to start with 22 inches of 240 strands divided into 4 groups of hair each with 60 strands and finally into 15 parts to form a pattern. You can see why this is a lost art! A ring in the center finding is for a fob or watch key.
Information from Miles of History on-line antique auction website



The following is a quote from Leigh Hunt in a May, 1855 article in Godey's magazine: "Hair is at once the most delicate and lasting of our materials, and survives us, like love. It is so light, so gentle, so escaping from the idea of death, that with a lock of hair belonging to a child or friend, we may almost look up to heaven and compare notes with the angelic nature - may almost say, "I have a piece of thee here, not unworthy of thy being now."
Information from Miles of History on-line antique auction website


 

Comments--Questions--Answers

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Date:
24 Nov 1997
Time:
09:41:55
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It's good to finally see some hairwork on the web! I own a copy of Mark Campbell's book, but my main interest has been hairflowers. It was difficult finding information about hairflowers, and I traveled 500 miles to sit down with a lady for a few hours so she could teach me how to make them. Since then, I have given slide lectures and demonstrations and have made a few small hairflower arrangements in shadowboxes. It is very inexpensive but time-consuming. Because hair is so personal and virtually indestructable, it is the perfect medium for keepsakes. I'm very pleased to see the growing interest in hairwork, because all forms of this quintessential art form should be preserved. I have a web page currently under construction. I'd be very happy to join your society. Please respond to this note as soon as possible; I'm very excited about sharing information! If anyone is interested in learning about hairflowers or hair wreaths, please e-mail me at MelMCook@aol.com. Thanks!!!

Melanie


Date:
02 Dec 1997
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12:19:16
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I am an antiques dealer who sells mourning and hair jewelry. Saw the article in the Antique week and couldn't wait to boot up and search. Happy to find you; are you interested in buying English mourning; have a selection of brooches as well as rings; the earliest is 1790; most are after Albert died with pearls, etc. Do you have any references on the hair betrothal jewelry? Thanks for being there. Sally Fine salfine@aol.com


Date:
18 Dec 1997
Time:
21:04:42
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This is the most exciting site I have found yet....I hope you received my e-mail and I will be visiting it a lot. I want to learn this wonderful art. I couldn't believe I found you! thanks again....Pamela Boggess


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  • Date: 04 Jan 1998
  • Time: 18:01:42
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Questions---------Questions---------------------Questions

Q1-What is the common denominator that draws people to collect hair work?

Q2-what is the most important factor in buying hair jewelry/work (next to personal taste, i.e., condition, etc.)?

Q3-What significant does hair color have?

Q4-Who are the present day crafters taking on the challenge to rediscover and revive the lost art of hairworking. ?

Q5-is anyone doing repair?

Q6-do you know of other countries/cultures who delve in hair jewelry/work?

Gail Selig


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  • Date: 05 Jan 1998
  • Time: 13:47:35
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Answers-------------------------Answers

HI Marlys, I will answer this from my point of view, as a former collector of hair work. I say former, as I used to collect hair work in the 70's-80's as an augmentation to my other loves: Quilting, tramp art and any works from the past that generally required a lot of work to do something that looked quite subtle and beautiful when finished.

1.-What is the common denominator that draws people to collect hair work?

From my point of view, I think people who collect these pieces admire the amount of time and precision it takes to make even a small piece. This reason, and also, in the older pieces, the historical and nostalgic value they present. They are truly romantic as well.

2. -what is the most important factor in buying hair jewelry/work (next to >personal taste, i.e., condition, etc.)?

To me, it was trying to even find it at a reasonable price in good shape! I found these pieces very collectible, even years ago.

3.-What significant does hair color have? I found no signifigance, however, back then, the fobs and things I saw generally were brown! I did not realize they came in other colors. However, I did have pieces that were hair paintings that included other colors than just brown.

4.-Who are the present day crafters taking on the challenge to rediscover and >revive the lost art of hairworking. ?

Unknown to me, with the exception of Marlys and her group.

5.-is anyone doing repair? There were always people that could repair anything, including hairwork.

6.-do you know of other countries/cultures who delve in hair jewelry/work?


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  • Date: 05 Jan 1998
  • Time: 23:08:17
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Hi Marlys, I have a few thoughts about the questions posed by Gail. I think one thing that draws people to hairwork is the fact that it is an actual part of another person. This element that we casually throw away can be made into something so breathtaking and yet it can capture that moment in time, be it a hundred years ago or yesterday. I have read that red hair was not used in hairwork because it was thought to be evil. I do not think this was true. When hair is worked up, especially on the braided items, it appears to be darker due to being compressed together. (Wrap a strand of your hair around your finger snugly and it changes to about the color it is when wet.) It is my experience that blonde or red hair needs light shining through it to show the color. The red hair I have braided ends up looking brown and blonde hair looks light brown. So my opinion is that all colors hair was used. I know of no significance for color other than the memories brought to mind by seeing or touching a loved ones hair.

Nancy


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  • Date: 06 Jan 1998
  • Time: 18:53:38
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I have loved hair work since I was a little girl and saw hair flowers in a shadow box that had been made with hair from my my Great Aunts and Grannys and Great Grannys. It was destroyed when I was still young, but I remember it well, and I remember thinking about these women in a more REAL way than when I just looked at their pictures. I feel the same way about any of the hair jewelry I see, or am fortunate enough to be able to handle. These people lived, loved, and died, and felt the same way about those they loved as I obviously do...they wanted something of that human form to remember the beloved with. I don't think there is much significance of hair color past the fact that the hair used was either of the person who had died, or of the person that was giving the piece to someone else, so the hair color was going to be whatever their hair color was! The color certainly has no significance for me, I buy whatever hair work I can afford, regardless of condition, because I think it deserves to be preserved, period! Unfortunately, I can hardly afford anything! I am buying a ring right now, because it has personal significance...the initials are the same as my "significant other." The hair color doesn't match either one of us, but I find the thought that someone who loved someone else loved them enough to remember them with an intricate, lovely keepsake, and I will think of that love and my own, whenever I wear the ring. I would also like to know of anyone who does repairs, and anyone doing modern hair work...I need someone for repairs for a piece I have that is falling apart, and I have a pony tail of my Grandmothers that I would like some strands used for a brooch or something for my Mom.


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  • Date: 07 Jan 1998
  • Time: 09:05:51
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I recently brought a watch fob that is made of hair. But the colour of the hair is hard to determine. It looks to be green! Does this mean the hair has changed from the original colour. Or does it need cleaning. And how does one clean hairwork? thank you Diana


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  • Date: 07 Jan 1998
  • Time: 20:21:21
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Thank you so much for all the useful information on hair jewelry. From the few pieces I have observed closely, this work is amazing to me; just the time and patience involved says a lot.

Thank you also for your beautiful site on hairwork. The old pieces seem to be sort of hard to find, and I have been keeping them hoarded away for myself when I buy them. I have been worried about how fragile they might be, but they seem to be pretty resilient. Should I give them special care? I have a gold ring with a braid inset into the band, and I have a wonderful bracelet dated 1863. I also have a couple of brooches with photos and small braids in them. They are so amazing!

I work full time at a university in Houston (mainly to support my antique and hobby habits! haha), but I also have a master jeweler's diploma. I buy and sell a lot of antique and estate jewelry, along with porcelain dolls and small antique collectibles. I have a space in an antique mall here in Houston and work several shows throughout the year. I got the jeweler's certification mainly to be able to "work" on or repair old pieces that I might get that need some TLC. I have managed to build a small library on antique/period/vintage jewelry styles, etc. to help with my collection as well as with items I buy to resell. I'm really looking forward to getting the 2 books I ordered from you yesterday. Thank you for making them available.

Best regards, Jane Hall 6301 Crab Orchard Houston TX 77057-1007


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  • Date: 07 Jan 1998
  • Time: 20:22:32
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1. How do you preserve and care for hair jewelry?


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  • Date: 07 Jan 1998
  • Time: 20:27:41
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Hi Marlys, I wanted to say thank you for the nice e-mail and adding my story to the site. I also wanted to explain that I had some emergencies come up and take all my time and I couldn't seem to get back here. You have some other wonderful site connected to yours as well I was able to go look at some of what you have sent me finally! I am truly enjoying being on your list so don't stop please and hopefully soon I plan to explore the first thing which is learning to make the hair art. ...I have my daughters hair as I told you but none of my sons as he always kept his hair like a marine all through school but now in the last three years he has grown a wonderful mane! as long as what my daughters hair was when she got the first cut....needless to say after finding your site and my mind has been going ever since....my son is afraid to go to sleep for fear he will awake with short hair!!!haha but I have been begging him to think about it and not to surprise me one day and come home with it cut but to promise me he will let me have it for the future of our family in hairwork hairlooms to pass on to him and his own. It's too late for his Dad to contribute! oh well but anyway thanks again and keep me a part of all this I will reply and participate whern I can....thanks ....Pam


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  • Date: 07 Jan 1998
  • Time: 20:44:48
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I wanted to ask everyone if they know how I can get a hold of 2 articles listed in one of Ruth Gordens old newsletters...

1. "Treasured Hair Work" , the Civil War Lady Magazine, issue 13, 1995

2. "Strands of Time" Victorian Decorating & Lifestyle, Jun/jly 96

Gail


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  • question: yes
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  • Date: 07 Jan 1998
  • Time: 22:21:55
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What is the Carmelita Johnson book referred to earlier on this site?


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  • Date: 08 Jan 1998
  • Time: 12:18:59
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Hello! To answer the question, Carmelita Johnson wrote one of the few books about Hair jewelry, called "Ornamental Hair-Work, A novices guide to collecting jewelry and household items made from, or decorated with, human hair". This was published in 1980 by Orirana Press. It's a treasure if you can find it!

Best to all, Gail


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  • Date: 11 Jan 1998
  • Time: 13:23:12
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Dear Marlys, I received the pin yesterday, it is more beautiful than I imagined. I am very happy with it. You said that it was made in the U.S., right? I look forward to hearing from you in the future about getting something made with my children's hair and I will routinely check your web site. Thanks for the beautiful item and the great service.

Gina


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  • Date: 27 Jan 1998
  • Time: 11:59:55
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What a wonderful web site!! I heard about it from the h-costume listserv and I was delighted by what I found there. Thank you. It goes into our permanent bookmarks!

Another little tit-bit I learned about hair work. The Henry Hastings Sibley House Museum in Mendota, MN has a paper booklet made by a young girl in the mid 19th c. (I forget the exact dates) It is filled with 'hair fancies', little ringlets, simple flowers, etc. made by the girl's friends as keepsakes. How common do you think or know this was? It reminded me of the various autograph books, etc. of my youth...

Glenna Jo Christen gwjchris@rust.net Visit The Curiosity Shop! http://www.rust.net/~gwjchris/


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  • Date: 27 Jan 1998
  • Time: 20:51:52
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Hi there...

I saw your web page on hairwork, and I wonder if I can ask you some questions about the craft. I became very interested in it about a year ago when I saw an absolutely beautiful piece of work in a little remote museum in central New York state, the Glenn Curtiss Museum. I was really taken by the intricate handiwork it showed, and I decided I'd like to learn how to do that and preserve that craft. I posted an inquiry on two newsgroups, and four people responded to me. One pointed me to your page. I'd like to join the Hairwork Society and also find out all I can about this craft. Any suggestions?

Thank you, Mary Anne Parker-Hancock


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  • answer: yes
  • Date: 27 Jan 1998
  • Time: 23:27:28
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Just a word concerning the question about articles written by Ruth Gordon.

Any articles she wrote and the dozen or so newsletters (H.A.I.R. Line) she produced are available from her at the address noted in the web site. If you can't reach her there, try getting an address from Greenfield Village/Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan.

Mrs. Gordon has done numerous demonstrations and traveled all over the United States researching and studying Victorian Hair Art. In her newsletters she illustrates how to make the hair flowers and has a primer on how to make the hair jewlery using a braiding table. Her directions are easy to understand and her language is intentionally simple and easy to follow.

Mrs. Gordon is currently working on a book on Victorian Hair Art and would appreciate any imput you could give her. She loves to hear from other artists! I learned how do to the flowers from her as a summer job and continue to do it as a hobby. I am not an "artsy" person. If she could teach me to do it, she can teach anybody to do it.

If you have a group that wants to see a demonstration, contact her about her program.

-S. McGirr Dutiful Student of R. Gordon


  • comment: yes
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 06 Feb 1998
  • Time: 06:51:10
  • Remote User:

Comments

Friends, Our family owns a hair wreath that some of us think is gross and others think is just wonderful! I subscribed to Hair Line (?) for about a year, but did not get inspired to try the work myself. Perhaps now that I'm exposed to you all in cyberspace, I will! I do have one question, however; how does one go about getting a piece appraised? If our large (About 20inches oval) piece had $ value, I believe I could change my kids' and grand-kids' feelings about this glorious piece of work -- and it wouldn't get discarded when I'm no longer around to protect it. Many thanks. I may not get back to this site too frequently, so if you have time to e-mail me your resonse, I would certainly appreciate that .Martha Calderwood (Caldermom@aol.com.)


  • comment:
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 10 Feb 1998
  • Time: 14:56:50
  • Remote User:

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I am a docent at "Ravenswood" a restored Victorian Site in Livermore CAlif. and we are looking for a braided Hair wreath or what ever. Can you direct me for info.? Wilma P. Myers wmyers@trivalley.com


  • comment: yes
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  • answer:
  • Date: 23 Feb 1998
  • Time: 11:13:12
  • Remote User:

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There's a neat article in Victorian Homes - February issue. "Putting the Victorian Era Under Glass". It is about the use of domes in Victorian parlors for hairwork, wax flowers, shellwork, etc. Evidently the hairwork domes are extremely rare.

Nancy


  • comment: yes
  • question:
  • answer:
  • Date: 24 Feb 1998
  • Time: 13:33:24
  • Remote User:

Comments

I would like to sell my hair. Would you be interested in buying it? It's reddish brown, straight, healthy, and about 20" long. How much will you pay for it. Lori

Contact Marlys at: marlys@hairwork.com


  • comment: yes
  • question:
  • answer:
  • Date: 27 Feb 1998
  • Time: 13:16:15
  • Remote User:

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Hi Marlys! I can't TELL you how much I enjoy your web site...it wonderful! I recently bought a collection of 9 OLD hairwork pieces, NEW OLD STOCK, just as they were sold in Kansas City at a store called The Big Hair Store. I think, from what the card with them says, that they were made in France by the J.E. Vincent Co. Are you familiar with with maker? And since they are "new", they have no findings. I listed one of them on ebay last night and emails are coming about findings, as where to find them. I thought since you know EVERYTHING about this marvelous art, that you would know of a source I could pass on to my customers. Please respond as soon as possible.

Thanks! Sharon Bauer


  • comment: yes
  • question:
  • answer:
  • Date: 27 Feb 1998
  • Time: 13:19:08
  • Remote User:

Comments

Wanted to add: These pieces I found are NEW OLD STOCK, from late 1800's. It was established in 1891 and the store had 5 stories, really BIG for that time! These pieces are museum quality...never used or worn, and have no findings. I think they were meant for customers to choose and have made, or choose from existing stock at that time, for personalized completion. Ask your wonderful readers if they know anything about the company or store. I'd love to know more.

Thanks, Sharon Bauer


  • comment:
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 01 Mar 1998
  • Time: 16:39:15
  • Remote User:

Comments

Hi!

Gail Selig suggested I write to you. I recently aquired a piece of hair jewelry <?> and need to determine value so that I can offer it for sale. I am pasting below what I wrote to Gail that resulted in my writing to you......

_________paste__________

I need some help and advice from someone who is knowledgable about hair jewelry.

Rita Perloff showed me my first piece of woven hair when she was in FLorida and I believe I may have found some. <Well, actually my husband found it while junquing on a biz trip but he didnt know what it was. <g>

Anyhoo,

Under 15X magnification, this odd little item is definately braided and then wrapped in designs sort of like hangmen's nooses. Spaced within the pattern of braids and noose-like knots <each knot is abt 1/3 inch long> are black beads. The beads are like no other I have ever come across. I suspect they are real jet beads!

I got out Sheryl Shatz' book and read about jet but I dont want to scrape the beads or hot point test them. They are so light that you hardly know they are in your hand. Each bead is ever so slightly different and there are no mold marks. There appears to have been a slight raised *equator* <for lack of a better word>, a sort of slightly raised area around the center of each bead that has been worn down over time. This lighly raised area is equal to about a third of the bead's surface. The beads are quite small, extrememly lightweight and somewhat irregular, having almost microscopic dings and dips in them. <How was that for a technical description? Ha!> I am 95% certain that they are, indeed, real jet.

The piece is is 15 1/2 inches long but is in a loop, like a necklace and is one continuous piece except it is too small to slip over even a child's head.

I dont believe the pattern of the beads is for a rosary but I wonder if this is some type of mourning piece? The beads can be moved along the woven hair about 1/3 of an inch in either direction. I'm sorry that I cant get a magnified shot of the braiding and weaving of the hair.

Can anyone tell me what this piece was used for?

I would like to sell this item but I have no idea at all as to it's value. Can someone please write and give me an idea of it's worth??

If anyone from JC wants it, I'd be happy to sell it at a very reasonable price. If not, I shall put it up on eBay, as quite frankly, hair jewelry give me the willies. LOL! Maybe I would feel differently if I knew who's hair it was or if it was my hair or a loved one's hair or some ancestor of mine, but <shudder> I dont want someone else's hair lying around on my desk. <snort>

Somebody puh-leeeze help me determine the function of this piece and it's value. Apologies in advance for possibly the worst description of an item that you have ever read. <g>

Here's the URL so you can view it:

http://members.aol.com/cyberookie/hairjool.jpg ______________________

Can you help me determine the age, approx value and function of this piece, please?

Thanks and as soon as I can get a few minutes to concentrate, I am going to visit your sote. Cant wait to learn more!!

Best regards,

Laurel in N. Fla. Member of Jewel Collect

FLaurel ~ ~~;==;<


  • comment: yes
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 01 Mar 1998
  • Time: 23:35:11
  • Remote User:

Comments

RE: My mystery Hair jewelry item......

I scanned a couple more pix at a higher resolution and here are the URLs:

http://members.aol.com/cyberookie/hair3.jpg

I have no doubt that this is hair. I can see it quite well under magnification. I am also pretty sure the beads are jet as they have all of the characteristics.

I would appreciate help identifying the item and determining the value. I guess I will auction it off on eBay but I need to have a figure in mind for a Reserve. I know that this is not an exceptional piece but it is very nice in person.... not fancy but interesting and very old.

I spent quite a bit of time at your website and particulary enjoyed the testimonials. In all honesty, it changed my opinions about hair jewelry. I have saved hair from my daughter and I couldnt bear to clean my dear mother-in-law's hairbrush after she passed away so I guess I am sentimental about hair, too.

I love all the watch fobs on your page. What lovely work! I shudder to think of all the hair items I may have passed up in my 20 odd years of collecting vintage jewelry. I wouldnt even have known what this was had not a friend shown me a fob last month.

Thanks again and I look forward to hearing your opinions on this piece. I may even write up the story of how this was found. It's sort of interesting. <of course, ANYTHING about jewelry is interesting to me! <g>

Warm regards,

Laurel flaruel@mercury.net


  • comment: yes
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  • answer:
  • Date: 05 Mar 1998
  • Time: 00:02:55
  • Remote User:

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Hi Marlys,

I would just like to once again thank you and to assure anyone that is considering buying hair through you that what you promise is absolutely true, the highest quality hair at a very reasonable and fair price.

My advice to others - TRUST MARLYS.

Sincerely,

Mark Zumbaur


  • comment: yes
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  • answer:
  • Date: 15 Mar 1998
  • Time: 10:03:06
  • Remote User:

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Dear Marlys:

I'm so excited to have found you!!! I have felt so alone out here in Hair Wreath Land!!! I am the proud owner of two Victorian Hair Wreaths and have long searched for additional information about the craft with very little luck. Your site has a wealth of information.

I can't believe you are having a HAIR BALL convention. WHAT FUN. I would like to come if there is still room for me. I am particularly interested in seeing Leila Cohoon's Hair Museam - didn't I read about her in People Magazine? I cut the article out and still have it in my VERY thin file of information on hair art.

Please let me know if I can still sign up to join you at the convention. Also, what are hair wreaths worth these days? I paid very little for the two I own (one came from a garage sale!) and I really haven't seen any for sale since that time (about 8-10 years ago). They are both in good shape - one is REALLY outstanding!! I think they are beautiful and have them proudly displayed - many people think they are horrible - but they are definately a conversation piece!!

THANK YOU for this website!!!


  • comment:
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 16 Mar 1998
  • Time: 20:15:08
  • Remote User:

Comments

My father owns a 3foot by 3 foot shadow box containing generations of our ancestors hair. The hair is woven into intricate flowers in a beautiful bouquet. Up until this point we had no idea that this was an artform. Is there a name for this artform?


  • comment:
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 16 Mar 1998
  • Time: 20:50:16
  • Remote User:

Comments

I am so excited about this site. I have searched for quite awhile to find information about hair art. As I said in the above question, my father owns a large shadow box with hair art in it. Another question I have is.... How can I find a date for this particular piece? Through the years my family has lost track of its lineage and timeline. Also, was it common to weave hair onto coils such as the one my father owns? I anxiously await a reply! Tera


  • comment: yes
  • question:
  • answer:
  • Date: 19 Mar 1998
  • Time: 07:04:46
  • Remote User:

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Sometime ago, someone left a comment on dissolved hair. Recently I went to a symposium concerning mourning and the topic of hair used as paint was covered. Ms. Davida Deutsch discussed this occurance as hair finely chopped up, mixed w/oil and clear paint and then used as paint itself. So, for one painting (usually a miniture on ivory) you could have each person painted w/the paint made from their hair, and the tree could be someone else's hair and so on. This iconology is popular in the 1810-1830 era. Most of the images that you see from this time period are direct copies of images that were published in pattern books used by these early traveling artisians.

Suzanne Carter Isaacson


  • comment:
  • question:
  • answer: yes
  • Date: 21 Mar 1998
  • Time: 17:42:15
  • Remote User:

Comments

Tera, Dating hair wreaths is not easy. Ruth Gordon (an authority)had some information on it in one of her old news letters. Unless there is some information on the back, or within the frame, you may never get an exact date. Sometimes there may be an old coin within the hairflowers, strange as it sounds, Ruth said, it's possible. The coin of course could be identified and dated. If you want, send me a self address stamped envelope and I will send you the article. I'm sure Ruth will not mind. The only other suggestions would be to research the piece through the family. Yours truly, Marlys Fladeland PO Box 1617 Orem, Utah 84059 If anyone has more information, please leave your comments---We do appreciate them!


  • comment: yes
  • question:
  • answer:
  • Date: 21 Mar 1998
  • Time: 17:57:08
  • Remote User:

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I looked through my files and sure enough it WAS Leila Cohoon's museum that was featured in the April 24, 1995 copy of PEOPLE magazine (page 66). According to the article, she has over 1,000 wreaths, rings and crosses. Approximately 1,000 people per year visit her museum in the Independence College of Cosmetology (the school she runs with her husband.) Apparently, she bought her first piece in 1959. After re-reading this article, I am even more anxious to attend the Hair Ball and see this extraordinary display. It is wonderful that she is willing to share her collection with the public.

Vicki


  • comment: yes
  • question:
  • answer:
  • Date: 21 Mar 1998
  • Time: 17:59:06
  • Remote User:

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In Arlington Va. at the Thomas J. Stonewall Jackson House, there is on display a shadow box with a very large hair flower arrangement that contains hair from the entire Jackson family including general Jackson. It is probably 11x16 in size and is a marvel to look upon. Randal Gerdes R.N.


  • comment: yes
  • question:
  • answer:
  • Date: 21 Mar 1998
  • Time: 18:04:38
  • Remote User:

Comments

Dear Marlys:

I'm so excited to have found you!!! I have felt so alone out here in Hair Wreath Land!!! I am the proud owner of two Victorian Hair Wreaths and have long searched for additional information about the craft with very little luck. Your site has a wealth of information.

I can't believe you are having a HAIR BALL convention. WHAT FUN. I would like to come if there is still room for me. I am particularly interested in seeing Leila Cohoon's Hair Museam - didn't I read about her in People Magazine? I cut the article out and still have it in my VERY thin file of information on hair art.

Please let me know if I can still sign up to join you at the convention. Also, what are hair wreaths worth these days? I paid very little for the two I own (one came from a garage sale!) and I really haven't seen any for sale since that time (about 8-10 years ago). They are both in good shape - one is REALLY outstanding!! I think they are beautiful and have them proudly displayed - many people think they are horrible - but they are definately a conversation piece!!

THANK YOU for this website!!!

I found you through the "Lacis" site - I was looking for a book on hair art - Do you recommend Mark Campbell's book?

Thanks for your time, Vicki


  • comment:
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  • answer:
  • Date: 27 Mar 1998
  • Time: 15:23:27
  • Remote User:

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You have quite an impressive collection. The time one of my daughters cut her hair short I saved the hair for future use. One of these days short- haired me will get around to making a hair jewelry piece to wear. I have been making/wearing re-creation historical costumes since 1971, and always wear re-creations so that my originals won't get damaged, dirty, or lost. After the first real antique brooch 'jumped' off a dress of mine, never to be seen again I started making copies.

The fob in your collection which you say has an amber bead seems to have a carnelian agate bead. I see bands in the stone of the type which carnelian has. Amber is soft, and a piece that old ought to be showing wear. Agate is very hard and the bead shown has crisp edges unsmoothed by wear. Amber sounds like plastic when you click it against your teeth, agate sounds like glass. Amber tends to be a warm orange, tending to yellow. Carnelian orange tends toward cooler pink, very much like the one in your picture.

Most of the watch chains you have look like late 1880's or early 1890's ones. The typical identifyer is designs made up of little marks like \|/ as if a tiny chisel made them. (Compare to Eastlake furniture, tho Eastlake is a little earlier.) Watch chains of this period often had a dangley bit in the middle, and went from one vest pocket thru a buttonhole in the middle, to the other pocket. Shorter fobs are usually later than that, going only from pocket to buttonhole and having the dangly bit at one end and the toggle at the other.

Your bracelet with its box looks like 1860's - 1870's bracelets. Cameos were very big then because of the 'Greek Revival' style which was popular at the time. Many buildings from that period look like Greek temples, especially government ones and banks.

I own one of the long kind of watch chain, which is a single braid about 1/3" thick. It has really simple fittings and no dangly bit or toggle. It's the only hair thing I own.

BTW, didn't Dover republish a book on braided hair technique? A friend of mine has such a book, and I don't know if it's Dover or the one you feature in your book section.


  • comment:
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 02 Apr 1998
  • Time: 17:03:56
  • Remote User:

Comments

Do you by any chance know where I can locate the book Victorian Jewelry, Unexplained Treasures by Ginny Redington Dawes and Corinne Davidov? I have been trying to find this book cause it was highly recommended to me for jewely during the civil war time Please contact Ann at: 1stcav@murlin.com Or leave answer on answer page.


  • comment:
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 07 Apr 1998
  • Time: 17:11:02
  • Remote User:

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Hi, I am interested in finding someone who is willing to teach me to make hair jewelry. I live in Maine, but am willing to travel. Please send your name and phone number as well as your address if you are willing to help. Or does anyone know of a course being offered for a weekend or week that would teach these skills?

Thanks! J.Crout wilder@somtel.com


  • comment:
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 09 Apr 1998
  • Time: 20:03:32
  • Remote User:

Comments

The Greater Bay Area Costumer's Guild (San Francisco Bay Area) is presenting a Victorian Day of Mourning. We are looking for someone to give a talk on hair jewelry. We can provide facilities for a slide talk. Can you recommend anyone in your organization who is located in Northern California and might be interested?

Thank you.

Sally Norton ritz@home.com


  • comment: yes
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  • answer:
  • Date: 14 May 1998
  • Time: 22:19:59
  • Remote User:

Comments

Could anyone tell me if there is a teacher of hairwork in New York City or Long Island, New York; or classes? --Thanks, J.B., New York


  • comment:
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 04 Jun 1998
  • Time: 15:04:04
  • Remote User:

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Hi! I am truely fasicanated by Hair Work. I didn't know what it was until I recently saw a framed hair design in an antique shop. Anyway, I noticed that you have books on the craft...I was wondering if you have any idea where I can find books on another Victorian craft, floral design. If you happen to know of any information, names, author, or magazines that would help me in the research of a book I am writing, your help would be greatlful appreciated.....Angela Willis....Please e-mail me at lilith@flash.net


  • comment:
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 11 Jun 1998
  • Time: 14:27:43
  • Remote User:

Comments

Someone please help! I can't even believe I found this site and if you can't answer my question I don't think anyone can. My sister found an antique woven hair wreath at an antique shop and is in love with it. She is a little leary about the price however. She said it is about 12" in diameter and is in the style of dried flowers. The wreath itself is in a parchment lined shadow box and the shadow box has an oak and silver frame around it. It is in very good condition. The shop owners have no history on it and could only tell her that they knew it was over 200 years old. It has various shades of hair woven into it but has an overall "blue" hue. Can anyone tell me what this is worth? She is at her wits end over whether to just get out the credit card and pay what they are asking or pass it up as too expensive. Thank you in advance for any help you can give. Feel free to e-mail your response.mcandrew@worldnetla.net. Michelle M. McAndrews


  • comment: yes
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 17 Jun 1998
  • Time: 00:25:01
  • Remote User:

Comments

i am a student studying costume and make up, and am an active member in gbacg, and i am planning to attend a victorian mourning event in sept. i saw the wonderful hairwork collar, and simply must know how to learn more about making one for this event. it's beautiful and would be prefect for my costume. please, please, if you have any info on how to make this or any idea on where to find more info on this type of collar, it would be wonderful. you can e-mail me at nocturne15@hotmail.com thank-you so-o much for your time.

sincerely, melissa nowacki


  • comment:
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 26 Jun 1998
  • Time: 14:07:31
  • Remote User:

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I was thinking about selling my hair, what are you looking for exactly when buying hair? Length? Condition? Color? Anything else? Please let me know so that I may consider this option. Thanks, AK


  • comment: yes
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 28 Jun 1998
  • Time: 18:21:34
  • Remote User:

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luv your stuff! Would you be interested in buying my hair? I'm thinking of cutting it. It's waist length strawberry blonde. (409) 755-6315 Julie


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  • answer:
  • Date: 28 Jun 1998
  • Time: 18:25:43
  • Remote User:

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lbuxton@interjetnet.net Julie Buxton here I want to sell my waistlength strawberry blonde hair, do you buy hair? Love your stuff!


  • comment: yes
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 29 Jun 1998
  • Time: 08:34:59
  • Remote User:

Comments

I am thrilled to find this site. I learned how to make hairflowers from my Grandmother years ago. Now she has passed on and I have just recently realized what a choice gift she gave to me. I would like to get in touch with Melanie Cook who I understand lives in Utah. I understand she also knows how to make the hairwreaths. I have only demonstrated makeing the flowers. I am now in the process of making my own hairwreath. I inherited a huge box of hair that my Grandmother had all labeled with names and dates. It all belongs to family members. Anyway I would like to see if I can learn anything new from what my Grandmother taught me. If anyone can please help me out I would appreciate it. Please contact me at hummel@mraux.tpeek.com or 2153 E. 2450 S. St. George Ut 84790


  • comment:
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 01 Jul 1998
  • Time: 20:11:30
  • Remote User:

Comments

I would like to know how hair jewelry was made, and what was done to make it last over 100 years. I am interested in the process. Thanks. STan.


  • comment:
  • question:
  • answer: yes
  • Date: 08 Jul 1998
  • Time: 11:14:59
  • Remote User:

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Dear Glenna Jo Christen:

In regards to your question on 1/27/98 about the paper booklet filled with "hair fancies" (little ringlets, flowers, etc.), I don't think as many of these hairwork friendship albums survived as hairwork jewelry and wreaths. There is a great book called "On Women & Friendship: A Collection of Victorian Keepsakes and Traditions" by Starr Ockenga, published by Stewart, Tabori & Chang, New York, 1993, which has an entire chapter on these hairwork albums. The book also has chapters on friendship albums, gift books, flower collections and albums, valentines, keepsakes, photographs, and mourning memorabilia.

Barbara Irvine Supernowicz historic@innercite.com


  • comment:
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 08 Jul 1998
  • Time: 11:52:09
  • Remote User:

Comments

I am thrilled to find this site! I want to make a piece of mourning jewelry or a morning momento from the fur of a precious long haired, 18 yr old cat who died 6-8-98. I have a small shoe box full of his beautiful and I would like to make something (like a pin) that could be worn close to my heart on a suit without causing others to feel uncomfortable. I have used short cat fur, from another cat, and tried to make something. By hand, I rolled and pulled the fur - like using a spinning wheel. I created several 12 inch long strands which I was able to braid together. The problem is that the fur is so loose and soft that individual hairs stick out. The other problem is that I cannot make a tight braid. Has anyone tried to use cat fur? Any suggestions as to how to make the fur stick together? Would adding wax ruin the project? Thanks for any help.

Diana Summers dsumme02@counsel.com


  • comment: yes
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 14 Jul 1998
  • Time: 17:06:23
  • Remote User:

Comments

I was thrilled to find the Hairwork Society webpage, which is an extraordinary resource. Over the past 10 years I have been a collector of 19th Century American furniture and decorative arts, and more recently, an antiques dealer in Northern California. One area of particular interest to me is Victorian jewelry, especially cameos, hairwork, and Etruscan Revival. I am absolutely fascinated with the romantic allure of Victorian hairwork jewelry and flower wreaths, but I rarely come across good pieces on the West coast.

One of my more unique finds, which I purchased in Massachusetts about 5 years ago, was a light brown hairwork watch chain with gold fittings, sporting a beautifully engraved gold double locket fob with a woman's photograph, and an 1852 California Gold half dollar coin attached to the center on an elaborately detailed gold post with two sets of initials. I can imagine the young woman lovingly presenting her young adventurer with the keepsake watch chain as he headed out to the California Gold Rush, where he subsequently attached the gold coin. I also own an oval 3 1/4" x 3 3/4" purple velvet locket style frame (circa 1860s), which opens to reveal two matching blonde hairwork wreaths with dried flowers behind glass and gilded liners.

After looking endlessly, I purchased my first Victorian hairwork flower wreath about 2 years ago. The small wreath, originally from Vandalia, MO (1870s), is in the traditional horseshoe shape, with pearlized and colored beads and leaves, a satin ribbon, and a photograph of a young woman in the original black shadowbox frame. Recently, I traded a dealer friend for a larger unframed Victorian hairwork wreath. Does anyone know where to find antique shadowboxes? My dealer friend has collected Victorian hairwork wreaths for some time and has amassed an amazing collection of about two dozen, including a monumental museum quality piece shaped like a harp. Are there any good reference books or articles specifically on Victorian hairwork wreaths?

Over the past decade, I have accumulated an extensive library on antique jewelry, and I would be happy to share information with other collectors. Just last week, I was lucky enough to find a copy of Ornamental Hair-Work by Carmelita Johnson in an obscure bookstore in Riverside, California. I am always looking to buy, sell or trade Victorian hairwork jewelry and wreaths, as well as corresponding with others interested in antique hairwork, so please contact me at historic@innercite.com

Barbara Irvine Supernowicz The Gilded Age


  • comment:
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 16 Jul 1998
  • Time: 14:58:15
  • Remote User:

Comments

Looking for this book: Sentimental Jewelry by Ann Louise Luthi. It was published in England. If you find a copy, or copies, please let me know. marlys@hairwork.com


  • comment: yes
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 20 Jul 1998
  • Time: 19:41:41
  • Remote User:

Comments

Love this site. Many years ago my Grandma would show me a braided watch fob as we explored the treasures in her top drawer. When she passed away I had the good fortune to aquire it. Such a fabulous treasure. I did not realize there were people out there as intriqued as I am. I am trying to add to my collection of a mere 3 peices. How do you know when a peice is over-priced, and who is selling good peices? Let me know. Contact me at Rootbeerba@aol.com


  • comment: yes
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  • answer:
  • Date: 23 Jul 1998
  • Time: 20:56:50
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(This was e-mailed to me and it is worth sharing, don't you think?)

This hair stuff reminds me of an odd moment on my trip last fall to Turkey. We visited a pottery shop, part of which was devoted to a hair museum. People could volunteer to give the proprietor a snippet of hair as a contribution to his hair museum! One might ask, what the heck would be in a hair musem? Well...just a whole room of shanks of hair.... a bit bizarre, I thought.

It was a rare sign of favor if the proprietor himself asked you for your contribution (yes, I was asked).


  • comment: yes
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 07 Aug 1998
  • Time: 19:23:10
  • Remote User:

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Desperately seeking help with research! I am researching the use of human hair in the art/craft of quilting. Looking for any and all references to same, whether it be embellishemnt, a strand placed in the batting, a signature, anything at all. I am writing a research paper, and this is a pretty obscure subject. People are usually amazed at my subject, but I know I am on the website that understands!! Gracious thanks for any leads - Teddy Pruett, Certified Quilt Appraiser, historian. Winter Garden, FL. TMauvlus@aol.com


  • comment:
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 10 Aug 1998
  • Time: 07:26:16
  • Remote User:

Comments

I have some vey old pieces of hair jewelry I think to be from 1840 to 1860. The hardware on each piece tested out as high 14k gold. I have a bracelet, brooch, necklace and a small ring. All are in excellent condition except for the cross that attaches to the necklace. There was a small gold hook that has come off. All are a very unique weave. I am looking for a buying source for these items. If anyone knows of anyone who is interested in this type of jewelry, please e-mail us at Rainbow2@airmail.net. I also have a digitial camera so I can send pictures. Any help will be appreciated. Kathy & Nancy


  • comment: yes
  • question:
  • answer:
  • Date: 11 Aug 1998
  • Time: 23:49:53
  • Remote User:

Comments

I am curating a Mourning Art ; Artifacts Exposition at a 19th C. castle here in San Francisco in mid-April 1999. I am looking for exhibitors and am also planning a program which will include a slide show, lecture, Columbarium tour, etc. I would love to include a demonstration of hairwork as part of the program, along with some contemporary pieces. I can provide you with additional details as they become available. The exhibition will run for three days and will include both antique and contemporary expressions of mourning art. Would like to get the word out to your membership and would appreciate your suggestions. .  I am currently in the process of preparing grant proposals and securing commitments from participants.  If you know of anyone who might be interested in demonstrating hairwork, please let me know . My phone number is (415) 239-8706.  Thanks,  Carole cwarner@flash.net


  • comment: yes
  • question:
  • answer:
  • Date: 12 Aug 1998
  • Time: 01:07:44
  • Remote User:

Comments

COMMENT FROM THE HAIRWORK SOCIETY FOUNDER AND PRESIDENT! Hello Everyone, I'm happy to see that you are using the comment pages. I hope they have been of some benifit to you. The Hairwork Society has just recently orginized and I will be making some changes to the website in order to benifit our members. This will be completed by the first of the new year. We will have a member only area, where you can post all your request and communicate with all the other group members. Many are demostrators, hair artist, instructors of the art, authors, collectors and dealers. You will find this area of great value if you are truly interested in the art of hairwork. You will be able to buy, sell and trade your hair items, recieve discounts on purchases for books, supplies and more. I encourage you to consider membership. I don't want you to be left out and not recieve the value of information that our society offers. Please fill out the membership form located at http://www.hairwork.com/about.htm Yours truly, Marlys Fladeland


  • comment: yes
  • question:
  • answer:
  • Date: 12 Aug 1998
  • Time: 01:40:04
  • Remote User:

Comments

I wish to thank everyone for the comments you have made and the praises of this website. I am unable to address every issue personally, so If you wish immediate assistance please contact me directly by e-mail . I always check my e-mail, and will respond to it as soon as possible. Have a GREAT DAY. Yours truly, Marlys Founder-President Hairwork Society



  • comment: yes
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 28 Aug 1998
  • Time: 16:07:07
  • Remote User:

Comments

Druing my business travel to K.C.,Kansas this week, I was quite impressed Nancy Robertson's talent and interview televised 8/26. As an admirer, not a hair artist, but a frequent flyer to Kansas, please provide a craft fair schedule for the month of September and October.

I am very interested in giving a gift to my mother with a design made from the first hair cuts from my two younger sisters and myself. The three locks are aprox 10 to 13 inches long, and well preserved. Colors: brunet,auburn,and strawberryblond. I understand an order can take several weeks/months to complete, but would like to submit a design that could hopefully be completed for Christmas '98.

Best Regards, Mary L. Miller mary.miller@mail.sprint.com


  • comment:
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 30 Aug 1998
  • Time: 19:12:45
  • Remote User:

Comments

I have been fortunate enough to be given a hank of hair. It came from a women who just died at the age of 101. My desire is to make a simple brooch for the sister who gave me the hair. My problem is counting and sorting into necessary strands. Is there some easy technique to accomplish this? TIA Mailto:Griffo@linkscom.com


  • comment: yes
  • question:
  • answer:
  • Date: 30 Aug 1998
  • Time: 22:48:38
  • Remote User:

Comments

If you have hair items for sale and are unable to contact a buyer through this website, try the http://www.ebay.com auction.


  • comment: yes
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 17 Sep 1998
  • Time: 09:00:08
  • Remote User:

Comments

I have stumbled into a place that was long ago to me. As a small child I remember the locket my aunt wore. I was told it was a last gift from uncle to her. I now know what it was I saw. I have no Idea were it is now. After reading your articles. I assume it is similar to braiding horse hair. That I can do? Is there anyhting special I need to do with it other than boiling for 15 minutes? Thank you for your help. And I hope I can make my fingers work it. I love it. Please send e-mail to jluther868@aol.com. I'm willing to trade work Beading(earrings,necklaces,etc.) for patterns. Thank you.


  • comment:
  • question: yes
  • answer:
  • Date: 19 Sep 1998
  • Time: 07:22:36
  • Remote User:

Comments

PLEASE HELP! I HAVE BEEN SEARCHING TO PURCHASE A VICTORIAN HAIR WEAVE. PREFERABLY IN A SHADOW BOX. PLEASE CONTACT ME IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO SELL OR KNOW WHERE I COULD BUY. THANKS! MSAPPINGTON@COMPUSERVE.COM


  • comment: yes
  • question:
  • answer:
  • Date: 19 Sep 1998
  • Time: 12:14:54
  • Remote User:

Comments

I am thrilled to find your website! We have a hairtree in our family...beautifully framed with many flowers....looks like a very large coursage. I have always been interested in this family heirloom and at times over the years have tried to find information on the art , but to no avail. It was made by my great great grandmother in the late 1800's...she was from northern Germany. As a matter of fact, she made 12...one for each of her children. I want to learn hairart. I want to start with the basics, so that I can learn this beautiful art. What would be the first book you would suggest I purchase....not for reading material...but to begin learning this artform. I'm in Austin, Texas...is there anyone in this area that you now of?

Thanks for your help... Chris Dixon


Date:
07 Dec 1998
Time:
15:13:27
Remote User:
 

Comments

I have really enjoyed this site. I am the proud owner of two Victorian wreaths. I didn't know where this art originated etc, and you site has been a godsend. Now all I need to find out is the value of both wreaths!


Date:
27 Dec 1998
Time:
20:56:34
Remote User:
 

Comments

Hi:

I am new to the internet. I was eager to surf the net in order to do research on things like Victorian hair jewelry. I was sure happy to find your website.

Respectfully yours, Jo Ellen


Date:
28 Dec 1998
Time:
20:01:24
Remote User:
 

Comments

Hello. I am a Civil War reenactor and I recently bought a wonderful ring for my wife. The ring is dated 1863 and is devoid of hair. My wife would like to have my hair put in the ring, however, everything that I have read says that the hair must be at least 10 inches long to be worked. We have the Collector's Encyclopedia and we both have found that this lost art is quite fascinating. I would like to build a work table for my wife and although the book has very nice pictures of the tables, I'd like to know if anyone has plans with dimensions etc. for such a table? Also, is it possible to work with smaller amounts of hair for the ring, as my profession would prohibit me from growing the suggested 10 inch length. Thanks in advance.


Date:
28 Dec 1998
Time:
20:02:47
Remote User:
 

Comments

Sorry, replies to the above can bbe directed to bushwack@epix.net -- thanks.


Date:
16 Jan 1999
Time:
06:40:05
Remote User:
 

Comments

Came across your site this a.m. and truly enjoyed all of the information you have gathered. I have worked in the antiques field for a number of years and have had the pleasure of viewing a number of pieces of fine hairwork both in floral(wreaths,etc.)and various decorative forms. Have always been delighted to find or view a new piece, each time wondering about the background of the person. I will share this site with several of my friends in the business of antiques, especially one who deals in some of these items. Site is nicely set up and a pleasure to browse! Linda Cassavant Medfield, Ma.


Date:
21 Jan 1999
Time:
19:40:35
Remote User:
 

Comments

Dianne Lavenburg 8990 Corliss Road Desoto, Kansas 66018

Like your web site. I also collect hair jewelry and even took a class on jewelry from Jeanne Bell- a great experience. I think I will be joining your society.


Date:
22 Jan 1999
Time:
18:14:56
Remote User:
 

Comments

what a wonderful place to gain information about a lost art, I am fascinated!! Mimi Torrez


Date:
09 Feb 1999
Time:
06:15:31
Remote User:
 

Comments

REAL NICE...

TBERG@WEBWEST.COM


Date:
14 Feb 1999
Time:
13:25:24
Remote User:
 

Comments

I AM SO GLAD TO FINALLY FIND THE SITE. I LOVE HAIR JEWELRY AND EVERYONE IN MY FAMILY AND WORK PLACES THINKS I AM WEIRD. I JUST ACQUIRED A BEAUTIFUL SHADOWBOX FLORAL HAIR DESIGN AND I FIND SOMETHING NEW AND INTERESTING ABOUT IT EACH DAY.


Date:
21 Feb 1999
Time:
16:56:33
Remote User:
 

Comments

I heard about your site yesterday after hearing Jeanne Bell speak about hairwork jewelry. I do collect many antiques but I have not purchased any hair items I will be looking for them now. They are wonderful. You have a wonderful web page.


Date:
22 Feb 1999
Time:
09:36:35
Remote User:
 

Comments

Hello , I am interested in learning more about events up coming .... I am in Maryland..Just starting to collect Hair works for my office, which I do wigmaking ,hair replacements..and would like to perhaps start making some things also.... thank you , donna email me at HHairware@aol.com


Date:
25 Feb 1999
Time:
13:34:23
Remote User:
 

Comments

What a wonderful site! I have been intrigued by hairart since a young boy. Nice to read the stories and see the picture. Harold in New Orleans.



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